Match Fixing: Do you trust sport anymore?

I don’t know about you but I’m a huge sports fan. In fact, there aren’t many sports that I won’t play or watch, even down to the curling when the winter Olympics are on. After reading another story of match fixing on the BBC website today though – Involving a player from my beloved and suspiciously poor performing Blackburn Rovers – I have to admit that I’m starting to wonder if we can really trust any of the sport we watch anymore?

My first and main sporting love is football or soccer for my US readers. The scandal that has recently come to light – which involves 6 players being arrested for things ranging from fixing scores to deliberately getting a red card – really frustrates me to put it mildly. There are so many times in sport when I look at a decision that has been made by a referee or a poor decision from a player and I used to just accept that people make bad decisions. Nowadays though, you have to wonder just what is really going on behind the scenes and who is being paid for every crazy decision that is being made. Even if a refereeing decision or crazy action from a player is genuine, the headlines we constantly see in the media can’t help but destroy trust.

You can see why it’s so tempting

If you were a player in the premier league earning huge amounts of money then I think you’d have to be crazy to get involved with any type of match fixing and risk wrecking your career, just for the record I abhor cheaters in all leagues. But when you have a player in a lower division who is not earning the mega bucks being offered £70,000 just to get a red card, then you can see why it might be tempting and why match fixing has become so rife in sport. When you think that all he would have to do is raise his hands to a player or say something really out of turn to the referee and he is £70,000 up, it must be tough to resist that sort of pressure. Again I’m just going to state that never in a million years would I do anything like that, I’m just trying to be real about the temptation that must exist.

Can you think of any suspicious events or decisions?

As much as I’d love to blame England’s recent unbelievably poor cricketing display in The Ashes series in Australia on match fixing, I don’t think they deserve to be let off that easy. We do know that cricketers have been accused and convicted of things just like that though, as well as bowling no balls during games and tampering with the ball. Then we have other events in football like referee’s finding a few extra inexplicable minutes of injury time at the end of a game, or football’s apparently not crossing the goal line when they clearly have. Even more noble sports like snooker have been dragged into the scandal with players throwing matches.

So do you trust sport anymore?

What do you think then? Do you trust the games or sports you watch anymore, or do you think that corruption in sport is more widespread than we realise?  Are there any suspicious sporting decisions that have always stuck in your mind that could be linked to corruption? Finally, do you think corruption would ever stop you from watching sport altogether?

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4 Responses to Match Fixing: Do you trust sport anymore?

  1. I don’t think the most recent revelations will ruin my enjoyment of sport in general but I am extremely suprised by how widespread the problem is. Amazed, in fact, that NZ cricketers were taking part in match-fixing.

    One lies to imagine that professional sportspeople will remain exactly that – professional.

  2. For me I’m a big fan of boxing because I’m a Filipino and I really do love Manny Pacquiao. I still do trust in sport especially in boxing because I saw how did Manny trained so hard for his incoming fights.
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